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Featured Global Business Articles

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Automating Supply Chain Resilience Should Be High on Your Digital Agenda

Advanced risk identification tools require companies to take a new approach to supply chain resilience.

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Leading to Become Obsolete

Frontiers |

Haier CEO Zhang Ruimin is transforming a manufacturing giant into a platform for entrepreneurship.

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Mastering the Make-in-India Challenge

Some multinationals have a winning India strategy that involves both local and global value chains.

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Intelligence in Global Markets

Mastering the Market Intelligence Challenge

December 5, 2016 | Murali D.R. Chari, Kimberlee Luce, and Inder Thukral

A shortage of reliable information is common in emerging markets. Because such markets are heterogeneous, the sources and methods for market intelligence require modification before they can be transferred from one emerging market to another. Market intelligence is thus best viewed and managed as a strategic asset that multinationals should invest in keeping up to date.

Managing Global Partnerships

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Competing Through Joint Innovation

The Chinese telecom company Huawei has used strategic partnerships to gain ground in Europe.

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Harnessing the Best of Globalization

Companies entering global markets should identify an approach that best suits their business model.

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Engaging With Startups in Emerging Markets

Partnering with emerging-market startups is easier if four key factors can be addressed.

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Developing New Products in Emerging Markets

A successful innovation developed by Cisco’s R&D unit in India offers practical insights.

Rethinking Your Multinational Strategy

Revisiting the Logic of Being Global

The state of the multinational and how “the world is losing its taste for global businesses” is the subject of a recent cover story in The Economist titled “The Retreat of the Global Company.” For many multinationals, the article notes, the case for global integration has been hurt by falling profits, lower returns on capital, and increasing pressures from governments looking to protect local jobs and tax revenue.

Second Thoughts on Second Sourcing

Multi-sourcing can lessen the risk of supply chain disruption. But it introduces new risks of its own. Companies should explore five questions before moving forward: Are all the sources in the same geographic area? What will it cost to develop a second supplier? How compatible is the alternative source? Are the additional CSR risks worth it? And will primary suppliers start holding back their new innovations?

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Perspectives on Global Leadership

Rethinking the East Asian Leadership Gap

Many western multinationals have a tough time finding local talent in East Asia — a problem that global companies originating in East Asia don’t seem to face. One problem: The cultural values and expectations of those doing the hiring and those seeking the jobs are at odds.

The Need for Culture Neutrality

Companies today work with an incredibly diverse array of people. To thrive, these organizations need culturally neutral, globally coherent leadership standards. These standards should promote needed outcomes without prescribing behaviors, since some behaviors are outside of the cultural norms in some countries. Inevitably, significant advantage will accrue to companies that ready their people for truly global leadership.

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Global Supply Chains

A Fresh Take on Supply Chain Innovation

September 23, 2016 | James B. Rice Jr. and Tim Rowell

For PepsiCo, entering the natural beverage markets of coconut water and smoothies meant developing new risk-management practices. In the coconut water business, “lead times are longer and supply is more variable than in PepsiCo’s traditional beverage supply chain,” write Tim Rowell of PepsiCo and James B. Rice Jr. of the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics. “The company has had to build enough inventory to minimize stock outs — without causing excessive losses through obsolescence.”