Opinion & Analysis

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The Real Lessons From Kodak’s Decline

Former photography giant Kodak is often cited as having lacked the vision to recognize the effects digital technology would have on its business. The reality of what happened — and the true lessons of Kodak’s experience with digital disruption — highlight the complex challenges posed by fast-moving technological innovation.


Amsterdam’s Intelligent Approach to the Smart City Initiative

  • Opinion & Analysis
  • Read Time: 5 min 

The City of Amsterdam is using data analytics to understand how it can better serve the needs of residents, businesses and tourists. With the strong backing of Amsterdam’s political leaders, the champions of the Smart City initiative are cultivating partnerships with government administrators and the private sector to field a wide range of pilot tests to uncover opportunities to improve everything from recycling and energy conservation to mental health services and information for tourists.


Customizing Your Social Strategy to the Platform

  • Opinion & Analysis
  • Read Time: 2 min 

Companies that want to draw innovation ideas from social media need customized approaches. An approach that works on Facebook, for example, is different from one that works on LinkedIn. Companies also should emphasize the “social” by helping users create or enhance relationships. Companies that do this often benefit through people’s subsequent engagement with the company’s online innovation activities.


Getting Product Development Right

The Spring 2016 issue of MIT Sloan Management features a Special Report on new product development. Articles include “Why Great New Products Fail,” “Finding the Right Role for Social Media in Innovation,” “Developing New Products in Emerging Markets,” “Why Learning is Central to Sustained Innovation,” and a look at the opportunities presented by the Internet of Things, in “Now That Your Products Can Talk, What Will They Tell You?”


Now That Your Products Can Talk, What Will They Tell You?

Products connected to the Internet of Things are providing unprecedented levels of information that can be used to improve both products and customer experience. For instance, a company does not have to wait until a customer calls with a complaint to know that a product connected to the Internet of Things is not working correctly. Instead, the product could already communicate the information, giving the company the ability to provide proactive service. Result: more loyal customers.



Debating Disruptive Innovation

Few MIT Sloan Management Review articles garner as much attention as Andrew A. King and Baljir Baatartogtokh’s “How Useful Is the Theory of Disruptive Innovation?” After surveying 79 industry experts, King and Baatartogtokh concluded that many of the cases cited as examples of disruptive innovation by Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen and his coauthor Michael E. Raynor did not fit four of the theory’s key elements well. Here, three experts provide responses to continue the conversation.

“How Useful Is the Theory of Disruptive Innovation?” was the question raised by an article in the fall 2015 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review. In this issue, several more experts weigh in on the topic.


A Promising Analytics Approach for Oil and Gas Companies

  • Opinion & Analysis
  • Read Time: 4 min 

GE is educating its customers in the oil and gas industry about the productivity gains they can realize through its Industrial Internet. As with other analytics efforts, it takes more than stellar technology offerings. It takes understanding how to reach decision-makers and others who will choose whether to adopt these business-changing systems. GE is accounting for these factors as it works to help an industry under stress move forward in the big data age.


How Transparency Changes Business

The Winter 2016 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review explores how increased transparency — and, in particular, the ready flow of information in a digital world — is changing the environment in which corporations operate. Transparency also is changing the distribution of power between large organizations and those who challenge them. Executives need to anticipate the possibility that any issues related to their company could someday be public knowledge.


Has Your Office Become a Lonely Place?

With increasing amounts of work getting done outside the traditional corporate office — for example, through employees working at home — those left in the office may face a lonelier, and even less productive, office environment. In fact, working remotely may be contagious, because if many people on a team aren’t in the office much, coming into the office has less benefit for the remaining employees. “Once a certain number of individuals are working offsite, everyone is isolated,” write researchers.


From the Editor: Disruption Everywhere?

The Fall 2015 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review has two big themes: developing tomorrow’s leaders, and disruption. In a special report on leadership, four articles explore how to engage, keep, and train the next generation of managers. “Preparing for Disruptions Through Early Detection” highlights the detection techniques to become more resilient. And “How Useful Is the Theory of Disruptive Innovation?” takes a deep dive into Clayton M. Christensen’s influential theory of disruptive innovation.



Sharing Supply Chain Data in the Digital Era

Effectively managing and coordinating supply chains will increasingly require new approaches to data transparency and collaboration. Supply chains in coming years will become even more “networked” than they are today — with significant portions of strategic assets and core capabilities externally sourced and coordinated. Already, progressive companies are developing novel solutions to the dilemma of data transparency by using data “cleanrooms” and digital marketplaces.


The Human Factor in Analytics Success

  • Opinion & Analysis
  • Read Time: 4 min 

An organization can have the best technology and the best analytics but still fail to deliver. As Intermountain Healthcare demonstrates, a commitment to the human dimension can drive return on analytics investment. Its leadership commitment to analytics and organizational processes promotes a culture where every question is welcome and data delivers insights. And its training and incentives for doctors and other analytics ‘consumers’ encourage behaviors that deliver better outcomes.


Rethinking Leadership

Businesses need a new approach to the practice of leadership — and to leadership development. “Leadership is really not about leaders themselves,” argues Joseph A. Raelin. “It’s about a collective practice among people who work together — accomplishing the choices we make together in our mutual work.” Nelson Mandela was particularly adept at this new model of leadership, Raelin says. “One of the most important leadership lessons we might distill from Mandela was not his acquisition of leadership but the way he shared it.”


Why Corporate Social Responsibility Isn’t a Piece of Cake

Corporate Social Responsibility “is fraught with contradictions, subject to political challenges and demands deep commitment,” argue José Carlos Marques and Henry Mintzberg. Responsible corporate behavior, they write, isn’t simply “doing well by doing good.” Instead, six changes need to be considered, within and beyond our private institutions. These changes include fostering ethical judgment within the enterprise, rethinking compensation and acknowledging the benefits of regulation.


On the Care and Feeding of Your Analytics Talent

A panel of experts discusses the challenges of finding, engaging and organizing data scientists for best results. They talk about how to support your data scientists and keep them engaged in the right kinds of tasks and how to integrate new talent into your existing data and analytics team. They also talk about the skills and traits to look for when recruiting and selecting your data/analytics team, and how to assess existing internal talent for data roles.



From the Editor: Expecting the Unexpected in Project Management

If there’s one thing that’s certain about undertaking complex projects, it’s that not everything will work out exactly the way you planned. The Spring 2015 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review highlights project management, in “Reducing Unwelcome Surprises in Project Management,” “How Executive Sponsors Influence Project Success,” “What Successful Project Managers Do” and “Accelerating Projects by Encouraging Help.” In a nutshell, managers must expect the unexpected in projects.


The New World of Work

Advanced digital technologies are swiftly changing the kinds of skills that jobs require. Researchers Frank MacCrory, George Westerman and Erik Brynjolfsson from the MIT Sloan School of Management and Yousef Alhammadi of the Masdar Institute studied the changes in skill requirements over the 2006-2014 time period. While demand has clearly grown for computer skills, it has grown for interpersonal skills, too. The authors advise people in all lines of work to be flexible about acquiring new talents.


From the Editor: In Praise of Humility

The Winter 2015 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review highlights decision making, in “The Power of Asking Pivotal Questions” and “Using Simulated Experience to Make Sense of Big Data.” It also celebrates acknowledging when you don’t have all the answers, in “Embrace Your Ignorance.” Other articles look at “technostress,” why product category labels matter and why “benevolent” mobile apps may be best at brand-building.

Image courtesey of Quicken Loans Inc.

Embrace Your Ignorance

The overconfidence of presumed expertise is counterproductive. Instead, data trumps intuition. Serious innovators take data seriously, argues Michael Schrage: “Organizations may be confident they know their customers, but they’re very likely to be overconfident. Most executives aren’t nearly as smart, perceptive or customer-centric as they believe.” Successful innovators, he writes, “have the courage of their curiosity” and run experiments that challenge their assumptions.


From the Editor: Strategy in the Midst of Change

How do you develop strategy in a business environment characterized by rapid change and considerable uncertainty about the future? That’s a question that many executives in fast-changing industries face. The Fall 2014 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review features a special report on strategy in changing markets, with articles on creating new strategic narratives, capturing new opportunities and finding the right strategic role for a board.

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