Data & Analytics

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A Data-Driven Approach to Identifying Future Leaders

Many executives believe they are good at identifying leadership talent. However, when asked how they make their decisions, they often cite intuition or “gut” instincts. Social science research, on the other hand, suggests that individuals are often prone to cognitive biases in such decisions. Rather than just relying on the subjective opinions of executives, some companies are using assessment tools to identify high-potential talent.

Research Findings: Analytics as a Source of Business Innovation

Sam Ransbotham and David Kiron, co-authors of the 2017 MIT SMR Data & Analytics Research Report, “Analytics as a Source of Business Innovation,” shared the findings and insights from their research into the changing landscape for companies looking to embed data and analytics into their strategies, processes, and operations.

AI and the Need for Speed

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 4 min 

AI is rapidly changing how organizations make decisions, serve customers, increase quality, and reduce costs. But the pace of change may be too fast for managers to effectively manage processes, react to new problems, and learn from data whose usefulness has a shorter and shorter lifespan.

Why It Pays to Be Where the IT Talent Already Is

As demand for big data technologies grows, so does the problem of finding sufficient skills. Result: Talent shortages could limit the rate of productivity growth. Research shows that labor-market factors have shaped early returns on investment in big data technologies such as Hadoop, a framework for distributed processing of large data sets. It turns out that when know-how is scarce, organizations that invest in new IT or R&D derive significant benefits from the related investments of other organizations.

Designing and Developing Analytics-Based Data Products

The combination of new analytical capabilities and burgeoning data assets are being used to form value-added “data products.” Such products have powered rapid growth in the value and success of online companies, but the expansion of analytics means the standard model for developing these products needs to evolve. An updated model needs to reflect new “time to market” expectations and input from a variety of stakeholders.

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Want to Improve Your Portfolio? Call a Scientist

In a conversation with MIT SMR’s David Kiron and Sam Ransbotham, associate professor of information systems at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College and guest editor for the Data and Analytics Big Idea Initiative for the MIT Sloan Management Review, Jeffrey Bohn, chief science officer at State Street Global Exchange discusses how he is developing better trading and risk strategies for clients using State Street’s proprietary data and analytics.

Achieving Meritocracy in the Workplace

Rewarding employees based on merit can be more difficult than it first appears. Even efforts to reduce bias can backfire; disparities in raises and bonuses by gender, racial, and other characteristics persist in today’s organizations not only despite management’s attempts to reduce them but also because of such efforts. The author describes how a simple analytics-based approach can address these concerns and produce a truly meritocratic workplace.

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Stephen Curry, the Golden State Warriors, and the Power of Analytics at Work

Organizations across an increasing number of sports and levels of competition are capitalizing on data to gain a competitive edge. Indeed, few industries have implemented data-driven decision making as successfully as sports. And learnings from the sports analytics revolution are applicable to a broad range of other industries.

Building a Better Car Company With Analytics

Using data and analytics to understand the complexities of modern business has become not only common, but essential. Gahl Berkooz joined Ford Motor Co. in 2004, eventually becoming head of data and governance and a member of the company’s global data insights and analytics skill team. Berkooz became acutely aware of how important analytics is to the company’s ability to thrive in the global marketplace. “What it boils down to,” he told MIT SMR’s Michael Fitzgerald, “is that we know how to make decisions. It’s about finding the opportunities to bring data and analytics to make better decisions.”

Pushing the Boundaries of Predictive Analytics and the IoT

From sensing issues with turbine engines to identifying non-standard washing machine loads, predictive analytics are a given in the Internet of Things (IoT). But what will happen to predictive analytics once everything is connected? This list of five links points to predictions and calculations that some people in the field are making.

Ready or Not, Here IoT Comes

The Internet of Things is on the brink of transforming business, but most businesses aren’t ready for the changes to the marketplace that the IoT will bring. There is very little time for companies to prepare for the changes coming as data-collecting devices proliferate. The good news is that by recognizing certain challenges, organizations can begin the possible, albeit difficult, process of getting ready.

Overcoming Legacy Processes to Achieve Big Data Success

Most large corporations are saddled with fragmented analytical processes, limiting their ability to operate with agility, flexibility, and insight. As a result, larger firms are often challenged when it comes to innovation and responsiveness. But Big Data approaches that enabled the flexibility and rapid growth of newer, smaller firms are being adopted by mainstream corporations. The goal: overcome legacy challenges and introduce greater corporate speed.

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Participant Questions From the Recent “Internet of Things” Webinar

On July 30th, 2015, MIT Sloan Management Review hosted a webinar on “Managing Data in the Age of the Internet of Things.” At the end of the webinar, many participants asked questions, but we didn’t have time to answer them all during the webinar itself. We’ll answer some of the most popular questions here. Included: Should an international organization be required to take control of uniting the Internet of Things (IoT) into one system?

The Talent Dividend: Interactive Infographic

An interactive infographic from MIT SMR’s content collaborator, SAS, and its partner site, AllAnalytics.com, highlights findings from the 2015 data and analytics research report, The Talent Dividend. The animated infographic illustrates several key stats from the report, including findings on finding, acquiring and managing analytics talent, and on changes to how companies are leveraging analytics for competitive advantage.

Image courtesy of Flickr user enshahdi https://www.flickr.com/photos/shahdi/5210439036/

How to Build (and Keep) a World-Class Data Science Team

To manage a first-rate data science or quant group, leaders need to build an engaging environment, get the team the resources it needs and balance being involved while also staying out of the way. In banking, for example, division managers generally don’t review loan applications. But in analytics, the most successful leaders engage regularly in hands-on research and continue to publish regularly even as they move up the executive ladder. By staying active in line research, analytics managers are able to hone their abilities to judge how difficult projects are and how long they will take.

Image courtesy of Flickr user janneke staaks https://www.flickr.com/photos/jannekestaaks/14391226325

Why Managing Data Scientists Is Different

The process of managing a data science research effort “can seem quite messy,” writes MIT Sloan’s Roger M. Stein. That can be “an unexpected contrast to a field that, from the outside, seems to epitomize the rule of reason and the preeminence of data.” While businesses are hiring more data scientists than ever, many struggle to realize the full organizational and financial benefits from investing in data analytics. This is forcing some managers to think carefully about how units with analytics talent are structured and managed.

Better Decision Making with Objective Data is Impossible

“Our world is awash in data, and data is not the same thing as facts,” writes Boston College’s Sam Ransbotham. “While data seems to promise objectivity, instead it requires analysis — which is replete with subjective interpretation.” Ransbotham argues that while having data is a necessary step towards making objective decisions, it’s a myth that data is objective. Moreover, findings that counter current thinking provide organizations with opportunity for distinction, differentiation and advantage.

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