Employee Safety

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Getting Workplace Safety Right

Companies aiming to be competitive in the long term do not see safety and productivity as trade-offs. Research drawn from multiple studies conducted with the support of companies, unions, and regulators in the United States and Canada finds no evidence that protecting the workforce harms competitiveness. “Once companies understand that safety is not the enemy of efficiency,” the authors write, “they can begin to build organizational safety capabilities.”

Image courtesy of Flickr user jurvetson.

Improving Environmental Performance in Your Chinese Supply Chain

Multinational corporations are under growing pressure to make sure their contractors and subcontractors in China meet environmental standards. Yet traditional approaches to ensuring environmental, health and safety compliance, such as checklist audits, have proved problematic. This article recommends that organizations work closely with suppliers, providing incentives for identifying, disclosing and addressing problems and establishing collaborative relationships with NGOs and industry groups.

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The Reasons for Accidents

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“If there are human operators in the system, they are most likely to be blamed for an accident,” writes MIT professor Nancy Leveson. She thinks traditional thinking about the causes of industrial accidents is limiting, in that the model used is that of chains of events leading back to the cause or the accident. A better model for today’s complex, automated systems: thinking of reasons why accidents occur rather than specific causes.

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