Frontiers

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Moving Sales With Trajectory-Based Mobile Advertising

Anindya Ghose, Heinz Riehl Chair Professor of Business at New York University’s Stern School of Business, is one of the pioneering explorers of the intersection of mobile and marketing. In his new book, Tap, he collects his findings and weaves them together into a set of nine forces that marketers can wield to drive sales via mobile technologies.

Leading to Become Obsolete

Zhang Ruimin, the CEO and chairman of the Qingdao, China, white goods giant Haier Group Corp., has done what most chief executives dare not even dream about. He blew up nearly the entire administrative structure of a global manufacturing enterprise, eliminating the 10,000 management jobs that once held it together, and reshaped the organization into a network of entrepreneurial ventures run by employees.

MIT SMR and MIT Press Announce Book Publishing Partnership

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MIT Sloan Management Review and MIT Press join forces to launch two new book series exploring the digital frontiers of management. One series will feature original titles. The other series will collect the best MIT SMR articles on key digital topics. Editor in Chief Paul Michelman will serve as the overall series editor. The series will marry groundbreaking new ideas from leading lights in academia and industry with practical advice on how to prepare for the future.

Reframing Growth Strategy in a Digital Economy

Too many big companies are formulating their growth strategies using traditional planning approaches — yearly cycles, historical analytics, incremental thinking. The velocity that characterizes this new digital economy means this kind of growth planning is obsolete. To assert digital dominance, big companies need to capitalize on their ability to do things the disruptors can’t — like plan globally and mobilize considerable resources.

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Why It Pays to Be Where the IT Talent Already Is

As demand for big data technologies grows, so does the problem of finding sufficient skills. Result: Talent shortages could limit the rate of productivity growth. Research shows that labor-market factors have shaped early returns on investment in big data technologies such as Hadoop, a framework for distributed processing of large data sets. It turns out that when know-how is scarce, organizations that invest in new IT or R&D derive significant benefits from the related investments of other organizations.

Achieving Trust Through Data Ethics

Eight out of 10 executives surveyed say that as the business value of data grows, the risks their companies face from improper handling of data increase exponentially. While digital advancements enable new opportunities for businesses to compete and thrive, they also create increased exposure to systemic risks. Success in the digital age will require a new kind of ethical review around how companies gather and use data.

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Paul Michelman on the Launch of MIT SMR’s Frontiers Initiative

In a video interview, MIT SMR editor in chief Paul Michelman explains the impetus behind the launch of the publication’s Frontiers initiative and the value he hopes it will hold for readers. Michelman explains the genesis of the Frontiers idea, the nature of the essayists selected for the program, and why it’s important for MIT SMR to launch this initiative now. He also discusses the themes that emerged from the essays, including the changing nature of the man-machine collegial relationship.

A Code of Ethics for Smart Machines

What’s happening this week at the intersection of management and technology: Smart machines need a code of ethics; hackers don’t deter blockchain adoptions; digitized goal-setting.

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Can Artificial Intelligence Replace Executive Decision Making?

Despite improvements in cognitive technologies, the “Jetson” dream managerial scenario of sitting back and letting machines do all the work is still far from reality. Decisions that executives face don’t necessarily fit into defined problems well suited for automation. Cognitive technologies will increasingly absorb the easiest aspects of executive jobs, but at least for the time being, countless decisions still require human engagement.

Showing 1-20 of 29