Intellectual Property

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What to Know About Locating in a Cluster

  • Research Highlight
  • Read Time: 11 min 

A study of two industry clusters in Denmark shows that the factors that can make clusters attractive — easy people movement and knowledge spillovers — can also make it harder for individual companies to retain proprietary knowledge. The authors present two case studies that present starkly different experiences. They conclude, in part, that clusters with core platform strengths that span noncompeting sectors are exceptionally attractive and that healthy clusters have core institutions with scale and scope in relevant fields.

Image courtesy of Mediatek

Developing Effective Intellectual Property Partnerships

All too often, companies from emerging and established economies talk past each other when discussing intellectual property. The result is that often fail to consider all their options for a productive collaboration. The authors detail five ways that companies can structure such IP partnerships, and say that it’s important for a company to choose the one that’s the best fit for the project: "The choice of IP business models is a strategic decision, not merely a legal matter."

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Finding the Right Corporate Legal Strategy

How can companies use the law to gain strategic advantages? Some companies move beyond viewing the law just in terms of compliance and use their legal environment to secure a competitive advantage. Companies can adopt one of five types of legal strategies: avoidance, compliance, prevention, value or transformation. The right strategy for a company will depend on factors such as its business model, managers’ attitudes toward the law and the legal department’s ability to collaborate with managers.

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Free Article

From the Editor: Innovation and China

In today’s global economy, there aren’t many large companies that can afford to ignore China in their plans for growth. The Summer 2014 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review features a special report on China, with insights about how to learn from China, what the future may hold for the Chinese economy — and how to do business in China despite the challenges of protecting intellectual property there.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Ming Xia.

Protecting Intellectual Property in China

“By operating in China, overseas businesses expose their intellectual property to risk,” write Andreas Schotter (Ivey Business School at Western University) and Mary Teagarden (Thunderbird School of Global Management). “But deciding to stay away entails the even greater risk of missing opportunities to acquire knowledge that is critical for competitiveness across a wide range of global markets.” To protect their IP, companies need to control and manage their IP vulnerabilities proactively.

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The Case for Standard Measures of Patent Quality

The current balkanized approach to measuring patent quality is not serving the users of the world’s patent systems. Like those advocating for the metric standard two centuries ago, we have an incompatibility problem today in the international patent system. But how the global patent system is organized and managed has far-reaching implications for innovation, consumer choice and corporate profits.

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Free Article

Fighting "Not-Sold-Here" Tendencies

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 2 min 

“Not-sold-here” tendencies, the instinct to not want to give away a company’s “crown jewels” through strategic licensing, are an impediment for companies looking to pursue open innovation practices. Monetary and non-monetary incentive mechanisms in support of technology transfer, such as an open innovation award, can help break this instinct.

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Measuring user innovation

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 1 min 

A new working paper examines the prevalence — and policy implications — of innovations that come from technology users.

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Free Article

Investing in innovation in hard times

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 1 min 

A professor’s analysis of innovation during the Great Depression suggests that downturns can present opportunities — if you have cash and good ideas.

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