Internet

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Can Sensors Fuel Productivity Growth?

The Internet Revolution has so far not produced the kind of long-term productivity growth seen during the Industrial Revolution. Digital technology drove U.S. productivity growth above three percent annually only between 1996 and 2004. Since then, productivity has fallen to about 1.6 percent a year. General Electric argues that productivity growth will jump again as the industrial Internet emerges, connecting machines like turbines and jet engines to factories, and using analytics to make better decisions about maintenance and production.

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Is the Mobile Web Changing Your Purchasing Behavior?

MIT Sloan Professor Duncan Simester

Has your smartphone changed how you make buying decisions?

If so, you're not alone, according to an interesting presentation that MIT Sloan School Professor Duncan Simester gave as part of an MIT Sloan Executive Education course this past summer.Â

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Repeat Performance: Morphing the Web

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Winner! An article by MIT professors John Hauser, Glen Urban and Michael Braun on matching content and “look and feel” of websites to cognitive styles has been named one of the 50 best scholarly management articles of 2009, winning an Emerald Management Reviews Citation of Excellence.

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05-Strategy-500

In Praise of Walls

A “postcompany” school of experts says information technology is enabling a new world of seamless collaboration among businesses. They recommend that executives tear down the “walls” and merge their companies into amorphous “enterprise networks.” Nick Carr counters that new technologies will never conquer cutthroat competition and shows why managers need to be wary of alliances that foreclose opportunities for advantage.

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Negotiating Lessons From the Browser Wars

In 1996, the browser wars became headline news. The conflict involved three of the most important companies of the early Internet era: Netscape, Microsoft and America Online. At stake was AOL’s choice of a browser for its online service, either Netscape’s Navigator or Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

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How To Be a CEO for the Information Age

Increasingly, information technology isn’t just for supporting the strategy, it is the strategy. Unfortunately, many CEOs send their managers negative signals about IT’s role. Only the “believer CEO,” who demonstrates through daily actions a belief in the strategic value of IT, can help others manage effectively in the Information Age. The authors offer examples of such CEOs and give some techniques for addressing blind spots to improve an organization’s competitiveness.

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