Japan

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How Disruptive Will Innovations from Emerging Markets Be?

Companies located in developing countries are currently serving billions of local consumers with innovative and inexpensive products. But what happens when more of those companies make the leap into more developed markets? Is it inevitable that these companies will overtake the more developed companies? Using historical examples, this article looks at how disruptors and incumbents compete. For incumbents, knowing that much of their fate rests in their hands is half the battle won.

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Lessons from the Japanese financial crisis

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As Wall Street staggered this week in the wake of Lehman Brothers' Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing and the sale of Merrill Lynch, commentators began making inevitable comparisons to Japan's long-lasting financial and real-estate crisis in the 1990s. "Is Wall Street's Crisis Turning Japanese?" Forbes.com asked.

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Supply-Chain Culture Clash

Manufacturing practices popularized by the Japanese, such as total quality management and just-in-time procurement, have become the worldwide gold standard for producing high-quality products. One might expect the same to be true of Japanese methods of logistics management (planning and arranging the transport and storage of goods and materials).

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Japanese Experiences With B2C E-Commerce

A four-year study of Japanese business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce initiatives reveals the innovative ways Japanese corporations exploit traditional aspects of Japanese business and consumer retailing — specifically, the consumer’s preference for paying with cash and the willingness of corporations to form cooperative alliances (the keiretsu model) — to further develop the

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How Japan Can Grow

Japan’s economy has been in the doldrums for so long that many Japanese seem to have adopted a resigned attitude ofSho ga nai (“That’s life”) toward it. But Japan, of course, can become competitive again, provided its political and corporate leaders take on four difficult but essential tasks.T

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The Evolution of Japanese Subcontracting

What has led to the development of Japan’s particular method of subcontracting? Theories that have attempted to explain Japanese subcontracting have critical shortcomings. A combination of political, economic, technological, and strategic factors has resulted in subcontracting’s growth and survival.

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Success as the Source of Failure?: Competition and Cooperation in the Japanese Economy

Will the Japanese business system, based on favorable industrial policies, the keiretsu, and lifetime employment, survive the current recession? While simultaneous competition and cooperation among companies have fostered growth and a system without “losers,” fundamental changes may require an upsurge in risk-taking Japanese entrepreneurs.

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The Japanese Juggernaut Rolls On

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. — French expressionThey don’t make much money, but they sure make a lot of stuff. — Down East Maine expressionRumors of my demise have been much exaggerated. —Mark TwainAfter years of observing U.S. industry under siege from foreign competitors, U.S.

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Supplier Relations in Japan and the United States: Are They Converging?

Supplier-customer relationships in the United States are changing rapidly. Where once contracts were short-term, arm’s-length relationships, now contracts have increasingly become long term. More and more, suppliers must provide customers with detailed information about their processes, and customers talk of “partnerships” with their suppliers.S

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Reassessing the Japanese Distribution System

JAPAN’S DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS, LONG THE TARGET OF CRITICISM, ARE CHANGING. DEREGULATION, NEW MANUFACTURING IMPERATIVES, consumer behavior, and the economy have interacted to reshape Japanese distribution. The trends have important implications for global business, since the system now offers areas of opportunity for Western manufacturers and retailers.

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