Multinational Companies

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How to Build Collaborative Advantage

For multinationals, it is increasingly difficult to maintain competitive advantage on the basis of the traditional economies of scale and scope. Future advantage will go to those that can stimulate and support interunit collaboration to leverage their dispersed resources.

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The Global Costs of Opacity

Although large-scale risks garner media attention, it is the everyday, small-scale risks associated with a lack of transparency in countries’ legal, economic, regulatory and governance structures that can confound global investment and commerce. New research identifies the causes and measures the effects of this phenomenon.

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Strategies for Competing in a Changed China

A decade ago, multinational companies seemed poised to dominate in China. Today that picture has changed. Whereas IBM, HP and Compaq had quickly won more than 50% of the personal computer market, for example, Chinese company Legend Group Ltd. is now the number one supplier. Research in 10 industries over the last 10 years reveals a pitched battle of competencies between multinational and local players and points to five strategies that can help multinationals regain the edge.

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The Need for a Corporate Global Mind-Set

When a certain U.S. multinational corporation sought to adopt a global policy on employee mobility, it convened a yearlong symposium with representatives from units worldwide. Through a format that encouraged brainstorming and in-depth discussion, a consensus gradually emerged that enabled executives to reduce mobility classifications from eight to two.

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The Myth of Globalization?

A series of surveys by Alan Rugman, professor of international business at the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University, and senior research fellow in strategic management at Templeton College, Oxford, suggest that only a small proportion of the largest companies that call themselves multinational have an effective global presence.

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Leading Laterally in Company Outsourcing

As service and product outsourcing become more commonplace, new organizational forms are emerging to facilitate these relationships. Chase Bank has created “shared services” units that compete with outside vendors to furnish services to the bank’s own operating units.

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New Strategies in Emerging Markets

Emerging markets (EMs) constitute the major growth opportunity in the evolving world economic order. Their potential has already effected a shift in multinational corporations (MNCs), which now customarily highlight EM investments when communicating with shareholders.

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Lean Production in an International Supply Chain

In a global supply chain, managers must plan for longer lead times, expensive air freight, higher inventory levels, poor sales-forecasting accuracy, and significant delays in resolving technical problems. However, the reduction of defects and engineering change orders associated with lean production can stabilize the supply chain.

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The Japanese Juggernaut Rolls On

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. — French expressionThey don’t make much money, but they sure make a lot of stuff. — Down East Maine expressionRumors of my demise have been much exaggerated. —Mark TwainAfter years of observing U.S. industry under siege from foreign competitors, U.S.

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How to Address the Gray Market Threat Using Price Coordination

Gray market goods — brand name products sold through unauthorized channels — are an increasing threat to multinational companies. The authors present a framework to help select the right approach to coordinating price-setting decisions on the basis of a subsidiary’s local resources and the complexity of a product’s market. Examples of price coordination methods are provided.

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Supplier Relations in Japan and the United States: Are They Converging?

Supplier-customer relationships in the United States are changing rapidly. Where once contracts were short-term, arm’s-length relationships, now contracts have increasingly become long term. More and more, suppliers must provide customers with detailed information about their processes, and customers talk of “partnerships” with their suppliers.S

Showing 21-37 of 37