Product Development

Showing 61-80 of 99

9-Social-Business-500

The Innovation Subsidy

Companies should focus less on marketplace premiums for their innovations and more on opportunistically exploiting subsidies for innovations. Thus Microsoft‘s Windows 95 development effectively garnered a $900 million subsidy by drawing upon a valuable technical population to test and help improve the system. An innovation subsidy, says the author, is individuals‘ and institutions‘ cost-effective bartering of resources to reduce risk.

04-Operations-500

Transformational Outsourcing

Outsourcing can be more than a tool for cutting costs and improving organizational focus. Increasingly, it is a means of acquiring new capabilities and bringing about fundamental strategic and structural change.

01-Strategy-500

Creating Growth With Services

In a world of commoditized products, companies are turning to service offerings for growth. The key to success involves redefining markets in terms of customer activities and outcomes, not products and services.

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012-big-data-and-analytics-500

Calculated Risk: A Framework for Evaluating Product Development

The product-development process is often seen as an undependable “black box” that rarely produces results that exceed business expectations. With an approach called “net present value, risk-adjusted,” the author offers an operational framework of quantitative tools that can be integrated into existing stage-gate methodologies to create a risk-adjusted NPV that considers the impacts of product portfolio, user needs, and technical and marketing risks.

022-Marketing-500

Beyond Better Products: Capturing Value in Customer Interactions

In a world of mobile talent, open markets and brutal competition, it’s increasingly difficult to maintain an advantage over competitors through product innovation. As a result, some companies have figured out how to outdistance rivals through customer-focused strategies that are virtually imitation-proof.

019-Leading-your-team-500

How To Be a CEO for the Information Age

Increasingly, information technology isn't just for supporting the strategy, it is the strategy. Unfortunately, many CEOs send their managers negative signals about IT's role. Only the "believer CEO," who demonstrates through daily actions a belief in the strategic value of IT, can help others manage effectively in the Information Age. The authors offer examples of such CEOs and give some techniques for addressing blind spots to improve an organization's competitiveness.

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017-Strategy-500

Surfing the Edge of Chaos

Every decade or two, a big idea in management thinking takes hold and becomes widely accepted. The next big idea must enable businesses to improve the hit rate of strategic initiatives and attain the level of renewal necessary for successful execution. Scientific research on complex adaptive systems has identified principles that apply to living things, from amoebae to organizations. Four principles relevant to strategic work at Royal Dutch/Shell are outlined.

023-Leading-your-team-500

A New Manifesto for Management

The corporation has emerged as perhaps the most powerful social and economic institution of modern society. Yet, corporations and their managers suffer from a profound social ambivalence. Believing this to be symptomatic of the unrealistically pessimistic assumptions that underlie current management doctrine, Ghoshal et al. encourage managers to replace the narrow economic assumptions of the past.

011-Strategy-500

A Dynamic View of Strategy

Strategic failure usually comes from an inability to make clear choices on which customers to target, what products to offer, and how to improve efficiency. Incumbents routinely bow to upstarts that innovate in those areas. The author shows established companies how to prepare for and counter such disruption with a dynamic process of continual strategic renewal.

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010-Operations-500

Planning for Product Platforms

A platform is a collection of components, processes, knowledge, people, and relationships shared by a set of products, allowing companies to efficiently develop differentiated products and to better meet customer needs. The authors describe the benefits and challenges of platform planning, presenting three underlying ideas, a method for planning a new product platform, and recommendations for managing the process.

Showing 61-80 of 99