profitability

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Free Article

Infographic: Social Business Driving Positive Outcomes

A key finding from the 2014 social business research report by MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte indicates that company values increase as “social maturity” increases. To advance in social maturity, companies should: 1) use social data to better advantage; 2) provide leadership vision for social; and 3) infuse social across the enterprise. An infographic illustrates the value derived from social, and the way socially mature companies outperform others in key areas.

Image courtesy of Flickr user abplanalp_photography.
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When Should You Fire Customers?

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 3 min 

Many customers are simply not profitable. Letting them go is one option, but so is trying to train them out of expensive behavior. Options suggested by Jiwoong Shin and K. Sudhir, both of Yale School of Management, include reducing services to unprofitable customers and educating them to use less costly service channels. “We recognize the mix of concerns, both ethical and practical, that swirl around firing customers,” write Shin and Sudhir. “We advocate firing customers only as a last resort.”

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Is It Time to Rethink Your Pricing Strategy?

Companies differ in their approaches to price setting, but most fall into one of three buckets: cost-based, competition-based or customer value-based. Customer value-based pricing uses data on the perceived customer value of the product as the main factor to determine prices.

However, implementing customer value-based pricing is not easy. Developing a customer value-based pricing program is a multiyear project demanding executive attention and requiring substantial changes in corporate processes.

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Free Article

Are Many of Your Customers Unprofitable?

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 1 min 

In the new Summer 2011 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review, marketing scholars V. Kumar and Denish Shah report some intriguing findings from a study they conducted linking certain types of marketing techniques -- those aimed at increasing customer lifetime value (CLV)  -- to stock price increases.

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In Praise of Honest Pricing

Companies should spend less time trying to fool customers with hidden charges and devote more effort to competing on differences that really matter, say the authors. Imaginative managers may want to consider how a move toward honest pricing in their industry — such as unit pricing at supermarkets and the U.S. government”s Energy Star program — could help sell more and better products to a loyal customer base.

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The Real Value of Customer Loyalty

It's a marketing truism: Higher buying rates and lower service costs make long-term customers more valuable. That, of course, influences what companies spend on customer acquisition and retention. But according to an August 2001 working paper titled “Customers as Assets,” by Sunil Gupta and Donald R.

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Strategy, Value Innovation, and the Knowledge Economy

For the past twenty years, competition has occupied the center of strategic thinking. Indeed, one hardly speaks of strategy without drawing on the vocabulary of competition — competitive strategy, competitive benchmarking, competitive advantages, outperforming the competition.

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The Delta Model: Adaptive Management for a Changing World

On the basis of research into 100 enterprises, the authors developed a helpful strategic tool, the Delta Model. Companies using the framework define strategic positions that reflect new sources of profitability, align the strategic options with their activities, and establish processes that adapt well to change. The researchers outline practical mechanisms for obtaining feedback from the adaptive processes, and they offer critical metrics to track performance.

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Do Customer Loyalty Programs Really Work?

The contention that loyal customers are always more profitable is a gross simplification, according to the authors. They posit that such schemes do not fundamentally alter market structure and, instead, increase market expenditures without really creating any extra brand loyalty. Dowling and Uncles suggest ways to design an effective program.

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