Open Innovation

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Image courtesy of Flickr user marcusnelson.

Creating Employee Networks That Deliver Open Innovation

Companies such as Procter & Gamble, Cisco Systems, Genzyme, General Electric and Intel are often credited with having attained market leadership through open innovation strategies. By tapping into and exploiting the technological knowledge residing beyond their own R&D structures, these companies outmaneuvered rivals. But while other organizations try to follow their example, many are failing because they neglect to ensure that the outside ideas reach the people best equipped to exploit them.

Courtesy of Flickr user Jinho.Jung

Bringing Open Innovation to Services

Services comprise more than 70% of aggregate gross domestic product and employment in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. As a result, both individual companies and entire economies face the challenge of how to innovate in services. One suggestion: Companies should both organize their innovation processes to be more open to external knowledge and ideas and also let more of their ideas and knowledge flow to the outside when not being used internally.


Image courtesy of Flickr user rishibando.

The 5 Myths of Innovation

This article explores the process of innovation in 13 global companies. Many of the standard arguments for how to encourage innovation were confirmed, but some surprises were uncovered as well. The article organizes its key insights around five persistent “myths” that continue to haunt the innovation efforts of many companies. The five myths are: (1) The Eureka Moment; (2) Built It and They Will Come; (3) Open Innovation Is the Future; (4) Pay Is Paramount; and, (5) Bottom Up Innovation Is Best.




The Era of Open Innovation

Companies are increasingly rethinking the fundamental ways in which they generate ideas and bring them to market — harnessing external ideas while leveraging their in-house R&D outside their current operations.


Innovation by User Communities: Learning From Open-Source Software

Manufacturers, not users, traditionally have been considered the most logical developers of innovative products. But user innovation communities present a great advantage over the manufacturer-centered development systems that have been the mainstay of commerce. When products that user communities develop compete head-to- head against products developed by manufacturers — Apache against Microsoft’s and Netscape’s server software, for example — the former seem capable of beating the latter handily in the marketplace.

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