Organizational Behavior

Showing 21-40 of 83

Image courtesy of Kyocera.

Amoeba Management: Lessons From Japan’s Kyocera

A persistent challenge for companies as they grow is how to maintain the high level of dynamism and employee commitment that drove success in the early days. Over the years, thoughtful managers and management theorists have formulated many approaches for dealing with the problem, all aimed at giving managers and employees more responsibility and accountability for the performance of their own profit centers. But few companies have taken things as far as Kyocera Corp.

Image courtesy of Flickr user bikeracer.

Why A Little Pessimism Is a Good Thing

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 2 min 

Researchers are now looking at the values of pessimism as well as optimism, and the uses of “strategic optimism and pessimism.” Even naturally sunny personalities can take advantage of dark moods and instincts to plan for the worst.

Image courtesy of Rolls-Royce.

Uncommon Sense: How to Turn Distinctive Beliefs Into Action

Most strategy making begins in the wrong place. Many companies rely on frameworks and models from the strategist’s toolbox, including industry analysis, market segmentation, benchmarking and outsourcing. As a result, they short-circuit the real work of strategy and miss out on finding new insights into the preferences or behaviors of current or potential customers. Few companies develop original strategies by formulating hypotheses and then testing them in a competitive setting.

advertisement

cross-500

The Collaborative Organization: How to Make Employee Networks Really Work

CIOs who learn to balance formal and informal structures can create global IT organizations that are more efficient and innovative than organizations that rely primarily on formal mechanisms. Organizational network analysis provides a useful methodology for helping executives assess broader patterns of informal networks between individuals, teams, functions and organizations, and for identifying targeted steps to align networks with strategic imperatives.

advertisement

advertisement

shook-500

Toyota’s Secret: The A3 Report

How does Toyota solve problems, create plans, and get new things done? Company managers use a tool called the A3, named after the international paper size on which it fits, as a key tactic in sharing a deeper method of thinking. This tactic and style of processing information lies at the heart of Toyota’s sustained success.

Image courtesy of Flickr user sean dreilinger.

Why We Miss the Signs

It often seems that changes and threats come out of nowhere – until we learn later that the signals were there all along and we just didn”t read them correctly. One step toward reading them better is understanding why we misinterpret them in the first place.

Showing 21-40 of 83