Data Scientist

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Give Technical Experts a Role in Defining Project Success

Poor communication between managers and technical experts is an obstacle to technology innovation that literally has been present for centuries. To overcome these issues, leaders need to absorb three key lessons about how to manage the inherent tensions between defining technical requirements and achieving valuable business outcomes.

Leading Analytics Teams in Changing Times

Analytics teams are often underfunded, misunderstood, and starved for talent. Extracting business value from data depends on nurturing the development and effectiveness of these teams — not just in terms of finding talent, but also in terms of getting leaders up to speed on how to use the insights analytics teams produce.

Want to Improve Your Portfolio? Call a Scientist

In a conversation with MIT SMR’s David Kiron and Sam Ransbotham, associate professor of information systems at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College and guest editor for the Data and Analytics Big Idea Initiative for the MIT Sloan Management Review, Jeffrey Bohn, chief science officer at State Street Global Exchange discusses how he is developing better trading and risk strategies for clients using State Street’s proprietary data and analytics.

Image courtesy of Flickr user janneke staaks https://www.flickr.com/photos/jannekestaaks/14391226325

Why Managing Data Scientists Is Different

The process of managing a data science research effort “can seem quite messy,” writes MIT Sloan’s Roger M. Stein. That can be “an unexpected contrast to a field that, from the outside, seems to epitomize the rule of reason and the preeminence of data.” While businesses are hiring more data scientists than ever, many struggle to realize the full organizational and financial benefits from investing in data analytics. This is forcing some managers to think carefully about how units with analytics talent are structured and managed.

The New Data Republic: Not Quite a Democracy

There are clear signs that the movement to democratize data is making real progress. Barriers such as infrastructure, culture, tools, and governance that once kept data access limited are quickly eroding. But access to data isn’t enough: Data democratization also requires knowing how to work with data and understand data analysis tools and techniques. Without these capabilities, the data democracy is only an illusion — and most people are still unable to participate fully.

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