Innovation Strategy

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Image courtesy of Flickr user rishibando.

The 5 Myths of Innovation

This article explores the process of innovation in 13 global companies. Many of the standard arguments for how to encourage innovation were confirmed, but some surprises were uncovered as well. The article organizes its key insights around five persistent “myths” that continue to haunt the innovation efforts of many companies. The five myths are: (1) The Eureka Moment; (2) Built It and They Will Come; (3) Open Innovation Is the Future; (4) Pay Is Paramount; and, (5) Bottom Up Innovation Is Best.

Courtesy of Novartis.

What Every CEO Needs to Know About Nonmarket Strategy

Nonmarket strategy recognizes that businesses are social and political beings, not just economic agents. Smart executives engage with their social and political environment, helping shape the rules of the game and reducing the risk of being hemmed in by external actors. These executives realize that in a global economy, sustained competitive advantage arises from tackling social, political and environmental issues as part of a corporate strategy — not just pursuing business as usual.

Image courtesy of Apple Inc.

A Business Plan? Or a Journey to Plan B?

From Apple to Twitter, some of the most successful businesses are not what their inventors originally envisioned. The Twitter story, in fact, is a powerful reminder that an entrepreneur’s main job is not to flawlessly execute the business idea so lovingly articulated in his or her business plan. It’s to embark on a learning journey that may or may not reach the destination originally envisioned. Instead, the company may end up at a more successful Plan B.

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Courtesy of Volkswagen

Which Innovation Efforts Will Pay?

For many companies, developing new products is a hit-or-miss proposition. Some businesses with successful innovation practices are relying on a new analytic tool to ensure that the hits are much more likely.

Developing an optimal innovation strategy

  • Blog
  • Read Time: 1 min 

If one innovation approach is helpful, you might think using more than one approach to innovation would be even more productive. Not necessarily, write Frank T. Rothaermel and Andrew M. Hess in the new issue of Business Insight, MIT Sloan Management Review’s collaboration with The Wall Street Journal.

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Capturing employees' insights about new business ideas

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How does a large, global corporation capture employees’ ideas for new technologies? An article from the Fall 2008 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review analyzes the results of IBM’s 2006 “Innovation Jam” — which involved 150,000 people.

Why Christensen thinks it's a good time for innovation

  • Blog

Sure, the economy’s bad. But it’s a good time to innovate, according to Clayton M. Christensen, a Harvard Business School professor who focuses on innovation. Our interview with Christensen is featured in the new edition of Business Insight.

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New thinking about strategy

  • Blog

“Traditional thinking about strategy is woefully incomplete,” according to the authors of an article in the current issue of MIT Sloan Management Review.

Breakthroughs and the 'Long Tail' of Innovation

To understand how breakthroughs in creativity occur, managers must understand how most collaborations work. “Managers first need to understand that invention is essentially a process of recombinant search,” writes Lee Fleming. “That is, I adopt the classic definition of invention as a new combination of components, ideas or processes.” Fleming adds that “Almost all inventions are useless; a few are of moderate value; and only a very, very few are breakthroughs. Those breakthroughs constitute the ‘long tail’ of innovation.”

Showing 21-40 of 57