Predictive Analytics

Showing 1-16 of 16

Analytics as a Source of Business Innovation

The 2017 Data & Analytics Report by MIT Sloan Management Review finds that the percentage of companies deriving competitive advantage from analytics increased for the first time in four years. Incorporating survey results and interviews with practitioners and scholars, the report finds that companies’ increasing ability to innovate with analytics is driving a resurgence of strategic benefits from analytics across industries. The report is based, in part, on MIT SMR’s seventh annual data and analytics global survey, which includes responses from 2,602 business executives, managers, and analytics professionals from organizations located around the world.

IoT Can Drive Big Savings in the Post-Sales Supply Chain

Product monitoring enabled by the internet of things can unleash cost savings, service improvements, and better customer experiences. But before this revolution can move forward, both the quality and collection of performance data need to be greatly improved. A research project at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics carried out in collaboration with OnProcess Technology underlines the potential for fresh approaches.

Predicting a Future Where the Future Is Routinely Predicted

The ability of artificial intelligence to sift through mountains of data and identify patterns — and problems — in real time is its key value for business. Using AI to predict failures and take action to prevent them will become commonplace in the very near future. But it can also offer insights into human behavior to help managers improve customer service and employee relations.

Internet of Things in Motion: Analytics and Transportation

  • Research Highlight
  • Read Time: 6 min 

Vast amounts of data are being analyzed to literally help trains run on time. With digitization capturing data on everything from the weight of connected rail cars to the quality of tracks to the terrain trains are traveling through, railway companies are now able to predict when breakdowns might occur and fix those trains proactively. The results are breathtaking: nearly 100% availability of operational trains.

advertisement

Pushing the Boundaries of Predictive Analytics and the IoT

From sensing issues with turbine engines to identifying non-standard washing machine loads, predictive analytics are a given in the Internet of Things (IoT). But what will happen to predictive analytics once everything is connected? This list of five links points to predictions and calculations that some people in the field are making.

Image courtesey of Quicken Loans Inc.

Embrace Your Ignorance

The overconfidence of presumed expertise is counterproductive. Instead, data trumps intuition. Serious innovators take data seriously, argues Michael Schrage: “Organizations may be confident they know their customers, but they’re very likely to be overconfident. Most executives aren’t nearly as smart, perceptive or customer-centric as they believe.” Successful innovators, he writes, “have the courage of their curiosity” and run experiments that challenge their assumptions.

Are Predictive Analytics Transforming Your Supply Chain?

Some industries like health care and retail are starting to see the transformational potential of big data and predictive analytics, but the cost of hiring skilled employees and the complexity of an extended supply chain network are daunting. New research suggests that the convergence of data science, predictive analytics, and big data have the potential to transform the way supply chains operate.

Team GB: Using Analytics (and Intuition) to Improve Performance

Becoming an elite athlete — or coaching a team of this rarified breed — has as much to do with talent and skill as it does with experience and intuition (not to mention some serious hard work). And data is increasingly part of that mix at the highest echelon of sports: the Olympic Games. At Team GB analytics are used to both monitor the performance of athletes and to predict how well a team will perform. But what could the future hold? Evidence-based coaching — and training.

advertisement

Sensing the Future Before It Occurs

GE believes companies will boost productivity and profits by using intelligent sensors and analytics to predict when parts and manufacturing lines will fail. This will smooth operations and accelerate product development. GE is investing in its operational use of intelligent sensors and hiring software developers to create better algorithms for analyzing huge amounts of data. William Ruh, head of GE’s global software development center, discusses the reasons behind GE’s investment in new technologies and why it thinks these will transform the global economy.

advertisement

Showing 1-16 of 16