About Us

MIT Sloan Management Review leads the discourse among academic researchers, business executives and other influential thought leaders about advances in management practice, particularly those shaped by technology, that are transforming how people lead and innovate. MIT SMR disseminates new management research and innovative ideas so that thoughtful executives can capitalize on the opportunities generated by rapid organizational, technological and societal change.

We distribute our content on the web, in print and on mobile and portable platforms, as well as via licensees and libraries around the world.

The team.

We source content for our readers primarily in two ways:

Independent research and ideas from global thought leaders. Since 1959, MIT SMR has been a forum for business-management innovators from around the world to present their ideas and research. Authors have included Christopher Bartlett, Max Bazerman, Erik Brynjolfsson, Henry Chesbrough, Clayton Christensen, Richard D’Aveni, Thomas Davenport, Sumantra Ghoshal, Daniel Goleman, Vijay Govindarajan, Lynda Gratton, Gary Hamel, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Rhakesh Khurana, Philip Kotler, Ed Lawler, Thomas Malone, Costas Markides, Andrew McAfee, Rita McGrath, Henry Mintzberg, Nitin Nohria, C.K. Prahalad, John Quelch, James Brian Quinn, Peter Senge and Lester Thurow. We work closely with authors to ensure that their articles provide interpretation and analysis for practicing managers: thought-provoking strategies that offer real-world management solutions.

MIT SMR-generated research and ideas (Big Ideas). The MIT SMR Big Ideas are collaborative inquiries capturing the best thinking, reporting and scholarly research on the management implications of one significant transformation in the business environment. We conduct interviews and original research to explore these implications. The Big Ideas illuminate major changes in the competitive landscape that managers are hungry to understand and that are the chief drivers of management practice innovation as enterprises respond to novel opportunities and threats.

Digital Leadership

This five-year-old program explores how to build a business culture that can thrive in the digital age. Relevant to both legacy and born-digital companies, we cover several areas of digital transformation including change management, cross-functional collaboration, and talent strategy. A key, cross-cutting theme is how digital technologies, for example, social media and internal communication platforms, both drive and enable new opportunities.

Artificial Intelligence and Business Strategy

This program explores the most important business opportunities and challenges that managers face from AI. We examine trends in corporate adoption of AI, including how to start and scale AI initiatives and how to combine judgment-focused humans and prediction-focused artificial intelligence agents. A key, cross-cutting theme is the importance of developing management’s understanding of AI to enable more informed business strategies.

Strategic Measurement

This new program reexamines the role of key performance indicators (KPIs) as a leadership tool. As a growing number of companies avail themselves of new metrics, new data sources, and new measurement tools, how are leaders using these new measurement resources to create organizational alignment and advance strategic objectives? A key, cross-cutting theme is to develop a deeper understanding of best practices around KPIs: What distinguishes KPIs from other metrics? How many KPIs should leadership focus on? How can KPIs be used to effect, rather than assess, change?