Ethics

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The High Cost of Political Influence

“Political influence may come at the cost of lower productivity,” explains Anders Olofsgård, a senior fellow at the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics at the Stockholm School of Economics. “Politicians are expecting something in return from you. One way to pay back politicians is through jobs. So you may be locked into keeping higher employment than you otherwise might be.” Olofsgård and co-author Raj M. Desai, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, argue that bloated staffs are no bargain for any company.

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The Hidden Costs of Organizational Dishonesty

When companies act dishonestly, the psychological costs outweigh any short-term gains. Dishonesty ultimately decreases repeat business and increases worker turnover and employee theft. Degradation of a company's reputation, adverse effects on employee values and increased surveillance of workers through expensive new systems eat at an organization's health. The authors offer proof that honesty is still the best policy.

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Beyond Selfishness

In this article, the authors make the case that corporate misdeeds are symptoms of a syndrome of selfishness that has taken hold of our business institutions, our societies and our minds. Drawing on history, literature, philosophy and management thinking, they argue that the syndrome is built on a series of half-truths — or fabrications — each of which has driven a debilitating wedge into society.

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Ethical Leadership and the Psychology of Decision Making

How can managers improve the ethical quality of their decisions and ensure that their decisions will not backfire? The authors discuss three types of theories that will help executives understand how they make the judgments on which they base their decisions. By understanding those theories, they can learn how to make better, more ethical decisions.

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When Is It Legal to Lie in Negotiations?

When someone asks, "What is your bottom line?" few negotiators tell the truth. But how much bluffing is ok? Business negotiations law is infused with ethical considerations. Author G. Richard Shell outlines the basic elements of legal fraud, illustrating the evolving concepts with numerous cases in which negotiators have been penalized for what some consider merely unethical behavior. "An ethical sensibility, far from being a 'luxury' in business negotiations, may be a negotiator's best counselor," Shell writes.

Showing 21-37 of 37