Employee Retention

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What It Takes to Reshore Manufacturing Successfully

  • Research Feature
  • Read Time: 24 min 

The process of bringing assembly work back to U.S. factories from abroad is more challenging than the economics would predict. In the United States, many key resources, including the manufacturing workforce,
have atrophied. Author Willy C. Shih (Harvard Business School) recommends that to reduce turnover, companies that embrace reshoring — bringing assembly work back from abroad — encourage workers to complete training and certification.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Torley.
Free Article

Can Social Business Make Employees Happier?

Social business can breed contentment among employees — but it doesn’t happen automatically. As the 2013 social business report from MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte notes: “Businesses that are making the greatest progress toward becoming a socially connected enterprise focus rigorously on four interrelated areas: leading a social culture, measuring what matters, keeping content fresh and changing the way work gets done.”

Image courtesy of Shell.

Six Principles of Effective Global Talent Management

Although organizations must pay attention to things like recruiting and performance management, competitive advantage in talent management doesn’t just come from identifying key activities and then implementing “best practices.”

Rather, successful companies subscribe to six key principles: 1) alignment with strategy, 2) internal consistency, 3) cultural embeddedness, 4) management involvement, 5) balance of global and local needs and 6) employer branding through differentiation.

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Dave Stangis, vice president of corporate social responsibility and sustainability for Campbell Soup

Using Creative Tension to Reach Big Goals

Setting long-term sustainability goals gives managers and employees permission to think about what’s really possible, says Dave Stangis, vice president of corporate social responsibility and sustainability at Campbell Soup. “It’s a much more effective way to drive system-wide, enterprise change.”
Image courtesy of Flickr user alvazer.

The Business Models Investors Prefer

Why are investors so bullish on companies like Apple and Disney? Is it metrics, management, industry prowess, good investor relations or good timing? Probably all of these. But something else may be at work, too. According to research conducted at the MIT Sloan School of Management, the stock market consistently values certain types of business models more highly than others. In recent years, investors have favored models focused on intellectual property and highly innovative manufacturing.

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Hire a “manager of one”

  • Blog

Here at MIT Sloan Management Review we're big fans of the folks at 37 Signals. We use some of their software and we try to follow their ideas about simplicity in everything from product to process.

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How to Retain Talent in India

Over the years, researchers have proven that when it comes to retaining employees, money does not buy happiness. Most human resources professionals know that while workers welcome pay raises, the boost in satisfaction that comes with extra money typically does not last, nor do raises alone keep employees loyal.

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HR Information Disclosure

Although most large corporations routinely collect data on employee turnover, benefits expenditures, training costs and so on, they rarely make that information public. But that could be a mistake, claim Fabienne Autier, associate professor of human resources management, and Rodolphe Durand, associate professor of strategy, both with E.M.

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A New Manifesto for Management

The corporation has emerged as perhaps the most powerful social and economic institution of modern society. Yet, corporations and their managers suffer from a profound social ambivalence. Believing this to be symptomatic of the unrealistically pessimistic assumptions that underlie current management doctrine, Ghoshal et al. encourage managers to replace the narrow economic assumptions of the past.

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