The Strategic Agility Project

This series from MIT Sloan Management Review draws on evidence and data analytics to answer a fundamental question: How can organizations achieve their strategic objectives? The series features the research of MIT Sloan School of Management’s Donald Sull and his team of researchers and data scientists. It draws on, among other sources, over 4 million Glassdoor employee reviews that provide insight on organizational culture and management practices of a large sample of important organizations.

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The Underpinnings of Strategy

Four Logics of Corporate Strategy

November 13, 2017 | Donald Sull, Stefano Turconi, Charles Sull, and James Yoder

Organizations often struggle with corporate strategy because executives lack clarity on how the parts of the corporation fit together. Without a shared understanding of the relationships between headquarters and business units, executives risk talking past one another when discussing strategy.

Developing Your Strategy

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How to Develop Strategy for Execution

Strategy works best if you determine your vision and vulnerabilities, then set business priorities.

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No One Knows Your Strategy — Not Even Your Top Leaders

New research reveals the surprising reasons managers don’t know their company’s strategy.

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Six Steps to Communicating Strategic Priorities Effectively

Clear, concise strategic priorities backed by metrics have value in communicating with stakeholders.

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Developing Effective Strategy

Turning Strategy Into Results

September 28, 2017 | Donald Sull, Stefano Turconi, Charles Sull, and James Yoder

Businesses develop strategies to address complex, multi-layered business environments and challenges — but to execute a strategy in a meaningful way, it must produce a set of specific priorities focused on achieving clear goals. Rather than trying to boil the strategy down to a pithy statement, executives will get better results if they develop a small set of actions that everyone gets behind.

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