Organizational Psychology

Showing 1-20 of 119

It’s Time to Tackle Your Team’s Undiscussables

When leadership teams struggle with undiscussables, symptoms range from unresolved conflicts and uneven participation in meetings to destructive groupthink and employee disengagement. The more undiscussables there are, the more difficult it is for the team to function. Ignoring them results in strained relationships and bad decisions. Here’s how leaders can bring the four types of undiscussables to light, improving team learning, problem-solving, and performance.

Imaginary Time Travel as a Leadership Tool

  • Read Time: 6 min 

Leaders can help employees manage immediate problems by harnessing the human capacity to think beyond the moment and recognize that “this too shall pass.” Psychological tools such as temporal distancing help ease the sting of current troubles. And the tool of “failure premortems” can help people identify dangerous risks and delusions in new projects by imagining they’re in the future looking back at why a project failed.

The Project Management Tool You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

  • Read Time: 4 min 

Usually only marketing teams think about brand building. But the branding process can also be used internally by project managers to build excitement for projects among staff. Project managers who want to be in a stronger position to achieve their goals should adopt the principles of traditional brand management — such as developing a strong pitch and taking advantage of a project’s natural attributes to generate enthusiasm among the people working on it.

Mastering the Digital Innovation Challenge

For Volvo Cars, pursuing digital innovation required fundamentally rethinking the organization, while also keeping the core business functioning efficiently. The company did so by balancing four interrelated competing concerns: (1) new and established innovation capabilities; (2) process and product focus; (3) external and internal collaboration; and (4) flexibility and control in relationships with external partners.

advertisement

Three Meaningful Strategies for Managing Rapid Change

  • Read Time: 4 min 

Global, social, and marketplace shifts are doing much more to transform the nature of work, how we work, and how organizations in both the private and public sector can best adapt to rapid global change. So how can organizations find new ways to avoid becoming saddled with legacy processes, technologies, and ways of thinking?

In Analytics, Resolution Must Be Accompanied by Resolve

For organizations, there is no shortage of hype about the potential for data and analytics. But the reality is that creating competitive advantage from data is elusive for many organizations. Our 2016 report on data and analytics, “Beyond the Hype: The Hard Work Behind Analytics Success,” outlines just how much resolve companies need to make an analytics strategy work.

Has Your Office Become a Lonely Place?

With increasing amounts of work getting done outside the traditional corporate office — for example, through employees working at home — those left in the office may face a lonelier, and even less productive, office environment. In fact, working remotely may be contagious, because if many people on a team aren’t in the office much, coming into the office has less benefit for the remaining employees. “Once a certain number of individuals are working offsite, everyone is isolated,” write researchers.

©iStock.com/martin-matthews

Marketing In Five Dimensions

Computers, scanners, mobile and wearable technology have made it both easier and harder for companies to find their customers. Easier, because there’s so much more data about consumer behavior; harder, because analyzing that data is a significant challenge (never mind deciding how to act on the analytics). Companies like Epsilon are stepping up to help businesses to figure out what the data tell them about their customers — and what to do with that knowledge. In a Q&A, Epsilon’s CEO Andy Frawley describes some of the challenges his company works through on a daily basis.

advertisement

©iStock.com/RSMcLeod

To Red-Card Corruption, You Have to Know What a Foul Is

Soccer’s governing body, FIFA, is in crisis over corruption — and MIT Sloan Management Review’s guest editor for Sustainability, Gregory Unruh, says the situation offers a useful case study for corporate social responsibility. By looking at the FIFA scandal, Unruh argues, managers can learn how to identify corruption from a systems perspective — and understand why it harms their business.

Are You Ready For the Certainty of the Unknown?

The skill set for both companies and individuals of the future will be to embrace impermanence and continual reconfiguring, according to Benn Konsynski, a professor of information systems at Emory University. He says both organizations and employees need to prepare for the “the remix era” and “the certainty of unknown.” He sees “improvisation” as a personal and enterprise necessity in the 21st century.

Catching Up with Scantily Clad Analytics Emperors

If you’re lying awake at night fretting that your competition has mastered analytics when you haven’t, take a breath — many of the stories we hear about analytics success are likely skewed. The transition to analytics-focused business is still far, far from universal, and that, says information systems expert Sam Ransbotham, means you have a chance to catch up.

The 2014 Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize

This year’s winning article on planned change and organizational development is “Making Mergers Work,” by Hamid Bouchikhi and John R. Kimberly. The authors examine why mergers and acquisitions so often fail to achieve the results and synergies they promise. “Our work in this field has convinced us that there is no ‘one best way’ but rather four distinct paths that can be followed to achieve identity integration: assimilation, federation, confederation and metamorphosis,” they write.

advertisement

Does Your Company Collect Data — Or Hoard It?

As it has become clearer that data offers value to companies, some organizations are tempted to take a “more is better” approach. But there’s a fine line between collecting data that offers value and hoarding data, which ultimately proves counterproductive. Ransbotham’s Three Laws of Data Collection offer guidance.

An Audio Summary of "Moving Beyond Marketing"

An audio briefing by Gerald C. (Jerry) Kane, co-author of the 2014 social business research report by MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte. The report indicates that that measurement sophistication is finally taking hold in social business. More than 90% of “socially maturing” companies actively measure their social business efforts. The authors explain why C-suite leadership is crucial to reaping value from social business.

Image courtesy of Flickr user zoetnet.

Making Mergers Work

For organizations to achieve the psychological synergies required to realize economic synergies from mergers and acquisitions, executives need to attend to a more complex set of identity issues. These issues define the essence of the entity and give employees a clear answer to the question “Who are we?” and external stakeholders a clear answer to the question “Who are they?” Left unattended, these identity issues will diminish engagement and will affect the performance of the merged entity.

Building Effective Business Relationships in China

As China’s growth and integration into the world economy continue, many companies are looking for ways to build effective business relationships with Chinese companies. China’s ways of doing business are becoming more Westernized, but non-Chinese executives must still work hard to build trust in relationships with their Chinese business partners. But developing trust between Chinese and Western executives takes time. This article explores methods for developing cross-cultural trust.

Peggy Ward, director of the Enterprise Sustainability Strategy Team at Kimberly-Clark Corporation

The Four Organizational Factors That Built Kimberly-Clark’s Remarkable Sustainability Goals

Peggy Ward, director of the Enterprise Sustainability Strategy Team at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, says that having strong support from the company’s Chairman & CEO, his global strategic leadership team, four business units and an external sustainability advisory board have been crucial to building and meeting aggressive sustainability metrics.

Showing 1-20 of 119